What to do with all those Facebook Ads

If I run on empty, I won't accomplish my goals.

They really suck you in, don’t they?

Those sponsored ads.

The ones that hit me are the second or third post on my Facebook page.  They promise weight loss or increased strength.  Yesterday’s hooked me, giving me the secret to losing belly fat over 35.  

Scroll further for chatter on intermittent fasting, ketosis, high protein, vegan, Whole 30.  It’s endless.

Read one article and it tells you to exercise in a fasted state.  Read another for the top ten things to eat before exercising.   

One eating plan tells you to consume your bodyweight in protein. Another tells us that a plant-based diet will give us all we need.

It’s just all so freaking confusing.

I wish I could deconstruct it all for you, but 1) quite honestly I don’t have that knowledge, and 2) it would probably require more than 700 words.  More like 70,000.  I could probably write a book once I learned everything.  Wait, there are books on this.

All the information on different eating plans is confusing.

Photo by Gaelle Marcel on Unsplash

What I will do is approach this in my (attempted) balanced, graced state.  This is what I know:

I need to identify one goal for the season I’m in and choose what supports that.  Ignore everything else.

The video I watched yesterday on belly-fat loss after 35 was intriguing.  He explained two of the three steps and invited me to learn more by “clicking the link below.”  Step one (or maybe two?) instructed me to exercise in a fasted state.

Oooooohhh.  I have some belly fat. Maybe I need to do that.  

But wait.  Belly fat isn’t the focus right now. I’m in the middle of training for a half marathon.  What is pre-run fasting going to do to my performance?  How am I going to power through this week’s 8-mile run if my tank is empty to start?  

Exercising on an empty stomach doesn’t help me reach my current goal.  Now is not the time to focus on belly fat, if that’s something I even want to do.

If I run on empty, I won't accomplish my goals.

Last week’s RunHouston 5K. Definitely put fuel in the tank before the race.

My other long-term goal is to train for a vibrant life.  You can read the post here if you missed it.  I want to take care of my body now so I can live the next weeks, months, and years with vitality and vibrancy.  There’s no use in being able to run ten miles if I injure myself to the point that I can’t walk my dog or climb stadium stairs at Spike’s football games without pain.

Facebook, in all his big-brothery ways, knows what I’m into.  He knows the over-35 belly fat ad will appear to me.  He knows I enjoy fitness, the science behind health and that I’m interested in a holistic approach.  Any given day I’ll see ads for essential oils, marathons, workout programs, and Fascia Blasters (which I did try and found great results. Look for a review in the next subscriber newsletter).

Side note: Somehow, he can’t figure out I’m not a candidate for MM.LaFleur.  The professional attire retailer looks awesome but my work clothes consist of Skirt Sports and gym shoes, not heels and suits.

Even though Facebook is familiar with my interests, that doesn’t mean he knows what’s best for me.  Only I do, and it’s worth considering what that is.

If we are drawn and pulled to every new fad and Facebook ad out there, then we’re at risk for never feeling accomplished — or confident in what we’ve chosen.

Take some time today to consider what’s important to you.  

What makes you feel physically and mentally successful?  

What gives you true energy for your day rather than zaps it?  

What do you really want out of your health journey?  

Once you’ve identified your goal, begin taking the steps to work toward them. Stay focused. Leave everything else on the Facebook feed.  If nothing else, it will free up a good thirty minutes in your day.  

That FB feed can consume way too much time and energy.

That FB feed can consume way too much time and energy. Photo by Bence Boros on Unsplash

Facebook ads can cause us to question our choices.  Identify your goal and ignore the rest of your feed.